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Subject:Seeking wise advice from experienced women
Time:11:15 am
Current Mood:hopefulhopeful
I have an interview with a city archaeologist for a two-month monitoring job coming up next week. I have never done any monitoring before (sort of terrifying), but I really need this job, and I'm eager to have new experience for my CV. I've come here to appeal for advice for a newbie monitor. I want to avoid rookie mistakes, and I want to do the archaeology justice and comport myself in a professional manner. Any words of wisdom you ladies can offer would be much appreciated. Also, anyone who has experience with Pacific NW coastal soils, or can point me at relevant online articles and reports. I grew up in the NW, but this is the first time I've lived here since I graduated high school.

Thanks in advance!
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synj_munki
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Time:2011-02-12 01:19 am (UTC)
i've done CRM for just shy of a decade, including monitoring.

Have you done any CRM? what type of field archaeology have you done (both school and paid)? what were your pertinent classes, including soils classes?

in general...
this is the textbook for fieldwork:
http://www.amazon.com/Field-Methods-Archaeology-Thomas-Hester/dp/1598744283/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1297471753&sr=8-1

this is a great general "cheat sheet book":
http://www.amazon.com/Archaeologists-Fieldwork-Companion-Barbara-Kipfer/dp/1405118857/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1297471824&sr=1-1

this is a very very good soils book and field approach:
http://www.amazon.com/Practical-Theoretical-Geoarchaeology-Paul-Goldberg/dp/0632060441/ref=sr_1_3?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1297471887&sr=1-3

this is a good historic architecture book:
http://www.amazon.com/Field-Guide-American-Houses/dp/0394510321/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1297471939&sr=1-1

great book on bottles:
http://www.amazon.com/Bottle-Makers-Julian-Harrison-Toulouse/dp/1930665342/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1297471996&sr=1-1

free download, USDA handbook for describing soils:
http://soils.usda.gov/technical/fieldbook/

scroll down and find a $5 soil descriptions for archaeologist (very good):
http://www.uark.edu/campus-resources/archinfo/catalog.html

arky laws:
http://archnet.asu.edu/Topical/CRM/crmusdoc.html

good book on what arky laws mean:
http://www.amazon.com/Cultural-Resource-Practice-Resources-Management/dp/0759111898/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1297472745&sr=8-1

great "how to CRM" textbook:
http://www.amazon.com/Practicing-Archaeology-Introduction-Cultural-Resources/dp/075911806X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1297472806&sr=8-1

free, website, wood and charcoal ID:
http://www.jefpat.org/Wood%20&%20Charcoal%20Identification/Wood%20and%20Charcoal%20ID%20Introduction.htm

free, soils with pictures:
http://www.wtamu.edu/~crobinson/Soils/

also check the OSHA website.

that should get you started. any questions?
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skjaere
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Time:2011-02-12 01:55 am (UTC)
Thanks for the links. I've been doing CRM off and on for about five years now (all phases, mainly in FL, OH, and VA). I got my MAs in the UK, and while I've spent a lot of time on human osteology, we didn't look much at soils.
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synj_munki
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Time:2011-02-12 02:34 am (UTC)
ah. I got my MA in Texas focusing on CRM and soils.

the geoarch book i linked to is very good (but kinda expensive); the "soil descriptions for archeologists" is very short and concise, leads you through it quickly.

oh, and http://www.sha.org/bottle/index.htm is a great book for american bottle dating. I don't have any links for pacific coast prehistorics on me.
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_illumina_
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Time:2011-02-12 11:50 am (UTC)
Which university? I did osteology at Southampton.
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skjaere
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Time:2011-02-12 04:01 pm (UTC)
Sheffield, but I did my undergrad at St Andrews.
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gwynhyffar
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Time:2011-02-13 06:34 pm (UTC)
I would recommend reading the scope of work very thoroughly and know exactly what is expected of you in the field. Do you have the authority to tell the dirt movers to stop? What is the process if something is discovered? You need to know and fully understand those types of things right up front.

Additionally, I would suggest that when you get onsite you introduce yourself not only to the dirt contractor foreman, but also to the guys doing the work. It makes everything go a lot smoother and with a lot less tension if you make the effort to know the people who you will be working with. Take the time to explain why you are there why it's important. Most of the time they will be a lot more cooperative if they understand why you are there.
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skjaere
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Time:2011-02-15 10:47 am (UTC)
Thanks. This is the sort of practical advice I was looking for. Interview in the morning! Eep!
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